The Jig Is Up

July 20, 2013 at 1:20 am (Chronic Pain, Living With Chronic Illness) (, , , , , , , , , )

This is not the blog post I’m supposed to be writing.

You may have noticed that I haven’t been as active online as usual – less blog post, no inane facebook replies, not even a “like” on a picture on Fetlife. My Gods put a giant smackdown on my head, and until I’m ready to compose This Great Entry that is, mostly, entirely their idea, I’m to keep my nose out of the Internet. I can give short email responses to timely matters if it is necessary, but everything that can wait, will wait.

I got a writ for this entry, because something somewhat major happened today in terms of my health and well being, and well, this blog originally was a way for me to tell large swathes of people about that sort of thing, so here I am.

The title is two-fold: one, “the jig” being my only slightly explained Internet silence, and the second “jig”, well…is frustrating and good in turns.

You may remember that at the end of my last hospitalization, I ended up with some terrible miscommunication between my pain management doc and the hospitalists. By the time I went to the pain doc to get meds, they had decided that they didn’t want to write scripts that matched what the hospitalists had decided, and ushered me out of the office with even less than a “see ya!”, as the doctor only communicated the end of our five-or-six year relationship via a nurse. I was not allowed to speak to him directly, at all.

Luckily, as I was leaving JH, I had asked my surgeon for a referral into JH’s pain management program, so I only had to find a month’s worth of meds until I was seen there; the surgeon begrudgingly supplied these. Then I had my new patient appointment at JH Pain Management, and I decided that Mistress Poppy had it out for me something bad.

At the first appointment, about a month ago, I was told that they would be reducing my opiates slowly over time. This made sense, as they had reached somewhat ridiculous levels when I was discharged from the hospital; however, my assumption was “reducing to a more normal amount”. (More on this later.) I was then informed that I would have to see a weight loss doctor (but not a surgeon, thank something), and agreeing to that was a non-negotiable point. I tried to explain that I had seen several weight loss doctors in my lifetime, and any time I’ve lost a significant amount of weight I have developed more health and pain problems, but it fell on deaf ears. Finally, I was told that the pain management office wouldn’t actually be writing my scripts – they’d give me a month’s worth, but no more – and it was impinged upon me that I had to find a local Primary Care Physician (PCP – what most people think of as “the doctor”) who would write the scripts for me. Oh, the JH Pain docs would still meet with me and decide the dosages and schedule, but the PCP would be actually doing the writing. I was pretty suspicious of this, but I was assured that they have plenty of PCPs who go along with this scheme, and I should have no problem finding one. (I did ask if they had a list of doctors who “played along”, and was denied.)

Well, it doesn’t take a medical genius to see why this is beyond stupid. The DEA doesn’t give a shit who decided how much opiates someone gets, they care about the doctor who actually wrote the scripts. We called over 20 PCPs both in Hagerstown and in Frederick, and of the ones who actually were taking new patients, and could see me before the month’s deadline was up, only one agreed to undertake this unholy arrangement, but when I showed up in his office he, too, decided against it. He referred me to a different pain management doctor, who wouldn’t even take my call after he found out I was already on opiates.

So my drugs ran out. Slowly, as I have learned over many years to skip a dose here and there if you can help it, should something exactly like this happen. I started calling the JH Pain doc’s office about 8 days before the deadline, and got no response from them at all. It was only when my medical advocate demanded to speak to the practice manager that I was finally, begrudgingly, granted an appointment – in a week. So you were spared a week of me posting self-succoring Facebook statuses about how crappy I felt on practically no pain meds whatsoever.

I get to the appointment today and I am pretty bad off.* This is likely how it didn’t hit me right away when my pain doctor lets me know that we’ve – I’m pretty sure this “we” does not include me – have decided to wean me off of opiates entirely, in the span of one month. I was so focused on please gimme something for the pain and the rocking, doc that I’m pretty sure I totally misunderstood him at first.

But no, that’s exactly what he said. And I guess “we” agreed. So although I was lucky to get scripts – this office has a weird habit of constantly reminding you that at no point are they contractually obligated to write a prescription for you, I guess so you feel doubly grateful when they do – I got the most complicated effing scripts in the history of prescriptions. The instructions on each bottle are a paragraph in themselves. Where a normal prescription bottle may say, “Take two pills every eight hours for pain” or whatever, these say, “Take four pills every eight hours for the first week, then two pills every eight hours the second, then two pills in the morning and one at night on the third…”

I had only enough wits about me, after my weaning-off-Fentanyl experience, to splork the words “Ativan” and “Clonodine” – two meds I’ve been given in the past to treat withdrawal symptoms. With the calmest demeanor ever, my JH pain doc explained that he’s “moved away” from prescribing benzodiazapines, although I could feel free to ask my PCP to write for them.** He did, however, agree to the Clonidine, mostly because it’s primarily a blood pressure medicine that no one would ever use recreationally, ever.

If this wasn’t enough for my poor, withdrawal-riddled brain to wrap itself around, I am now on a mysterious “list” for an “in-patient pain program”. I tried to explain that I don’t have the kind of life where I can just hop off to the hospital for an unknown amount of time, but the odd assurance I received was that this wasn’t happening today, as the waiting list is very long. (Of course, this means that not only will I get no notice on when I will be going to the hospital, but that it could be anytime starting tomorrow until 2020.) The concept is actually kinda cool, in a way that unfortunately reminds me too much of a psych admit: they wean you off everything you’re on, then put you in the program and with a team of pain docs, physical therapists, counselors, occupational therapists, and others. Together they figure out a long-term strategy for dealing with your pain. There is some, but not much, focus on what’s actually causing your pain (as most un-Del like people know that sort of thing), but it might lead to some diagnostic testing, at least.

So where does that leave me?

Well, the last time I detoxed from opiates was, oh, the worst thing that ever happened to me physically. It was done over three months instead of one, with the idea of taking very gradual steps. This time, I have 30 days to go from “holy crap I didn’t know they made a pill with that many milligrams” to “here, take some Tylenol”. At least when I did this last time, I had a different opiate at a steady level. What that meant, was that although the withdrawal sucked really bad, my pain was under some modicum of control. Not so this time. By the end of August, I will be taking Mobic, which is an NSAID, and little else. If this past week was any sort of guide to what life will be like on way less medication, not only did my arms and legs hurt so bad that there were times I seriously thought about wetting the bed rather than having to walk to the bathroom, but my still-healing surgical wound burned so deeply I couldn’t eat. (Which I guess helped the first problem in its own way).

There is an upside, even though it is very difficult for me to see now. Many specialists have turned me away, or blamed my symptoms, on the opiates. In fact, the reason the JH pain doc is doing this, even though I’m dubious that it actually applies to me, is valid. His reasoning is that there is a condition called hyperalgia, where your brain gets so used to opiate medication that the medications start causing more pain, and not treating it. As I still get relief from my meds, I am more than a lot skeptical that this actually applies to me, but even if it doesn’t I’m sure my opiate receptors could use a vacation. Most people who need chronic pain meds take a “vacation” now and again, so their tolerance can lower closer to normal people’s. It’s helpful for people like me, who seem to need a lot of surgery, because there does come a time when they just can’t use opiates at all to treat pain, and there’s not a lot of other options. So by taking a “vacation”, I am future-banking a lower tolerance to pain medication, so any future surgeries will not need the amounts that make each nurse, every shift, look at my file and go, “Um, what?”

And honestly, if there is an answer out there for my pain that isn’t opiates, I’m all ears. I’m not a fan of being on them, and going off of them could open up something very important – the ability to drive. I don’t drive for a variety of reasons, but the first and foremost is that if I were ever pulled over and they thought to run a blood test, I’d be a fucking goner. And there are times when I know my reaction time is slowed down from the meds, and I’m infinitely distracted. So resetting the system may allow me to drive my own car, which I haven’t done for many years.

That all being said, I’m still displeased that this was sprung on me when I was actively in withdrawal. If something goes awry – which it can, which is why many people undergo this sort of thing as an inpatient – I could very well argue lack of informed consent. I probably wouldn’t win, unless my judge has experienced what it is like to be in active withdrawal and a ridiculous amount of physical pain, but I don’t think I’d be laughed out of court, either.

It is very likely that between The Entry They Want and the terrible withdrawal and pain I have to look forward to, I’ll either be on the Internet every fucking second I can, bitching about how terrible my life sucks; or you’ll hear from me some time in September.

*Those who know me intimately will attest to this: I have a collection of pill bottles with one pill in them. In the same way that I hate reading the last chapter of a series of books because the world will cease to exist in my head, I hold onto those pills, telling myself that someday it will be that bad and I will be pleased that present-me saved the damn pill for future-me. This week drained every resource I had, and when I told Rave I had thrown out several now-empty pill bottles, the blood drained from her face. She knows how long I’ve stowed away some of these “last resort” meds, and I spent every single one of them this past week.

**You know, the imaginary PCP I’ve found who will play this stupid game. Well, in all honesty, I do have an appointment at the end of August for a PCP whose practice is under the JH umbrella, so there’s a chance this may work out, but not until after I’ve detoxed from my meds.

6 Comments

  1. heldc said,

    I am so sorry to hear this. I hope it works out for you.

  2. facingthefireswithin said,

    Gods man, that is nuts. I don’t really have words and good luck seems so empty. Thank you for letting us know.

  3. Elizabeth said,

    Aw, man, I’m so sorry that this has become so difficult for you. I hope that somehow, things work out so that you aren’t in so much pain all the time. Will be thinking of you and keeping you in my prayers. Elfy love to you!

  4. theinfinitebattle8 said,

    Having known someone who went through a similar issue (sudden quick detox without warning), I wish you luck and health.

  5. molly said,

    John Hopkins’ inpatient pain program is in a lock-down psychiatric ward. Please make sure you know that before you go there. The psychiatrists that run the inpatient pain management program prescribe tons of antipsychotics (seroquel, abilify, zyprexa, geodon, risperdal) and antidepressants. They take the patient off opiates and put the patient on antipsychotics. The psychiatrists in the inpatient program do NOT run diagnostic tests. They think we (people w/ chronic pain) are crazy.

    John Hopkins’ inpatient Pain Treatment Program (PTP) is on a locked unit in their psychiatric hospital. (it’s not a medical unit- you cannot have visitors whenever you want, you cannot walk around, etc.)

    See here:

    http://php.ratemds.com/social/?q=node/35338

    http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/psychiatry/specialty_areas/pain/patient_information/faq.html

    I’m sorry that these doctors are sucking.

    Solidarity :)

  6. aeddubh said,

    That really sucks. I will keep you in my prayers… I’m burning a brand-new candle for Brigid right now and I’ve just asked Her to help you with this. Much love.

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